10.42 ID Variables

20180723 From our observations so far we note that the variable (date) acts as an identifier as does the variable (location). Given a date and a location we have an observation of the remaining variables. Thus we note that these two variables are so-called identifiers. Identifiers would not usually be used as independent variables for building predictive analytics models.

# Note any identifiers.

id <- c("date", "location")

We might get a sense of how this works with the following which will list a random sample of locations and how long the observations for that location have been collected.

ds[id] %>%
  group_by(location) %>%
  count() %>%
  rename(days=n) %>%
  mutate(years=round(days/365)) %>%
  as.data.frame() %>%
  sample_n(10)
##         location days years
## 1    Williamtown 3649    10
## 2       Ballarat 3680    10
## 3   MountGambier 3679    10
## 4          Moree 3649    10
## 5      Newcastle 3680    10
## 6         Albury 3680    10
## 7           Sale 3649    10
## 8  NorfolkIsland 3649    10
## 9       Portland 3649    10
## 10         Uluru 2218     6

The data for each location ranges in length from 4 years up to 9 years, though most have 8 years of data.

ds[id] %>%
  group_by(location) %>%
  count() %>%
  rename(days=n) %>%
  mutate(years=round(days/365)) %>%
  ungroup() %>%
  select(years) %>%
  summary()
##      years       
##  Min.   : 6.000  
##  1st Qu.:10.000  
##  Median :10.000  
##  Mean   : 9.878  
##  3rd Qu.:10.000  
##  Max.   :11.000


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